Subscribe

Subscribe
Subscribe to the Oregon Republican Reporter, Mt Morris Times, Tri-County Press and Forreston Journal
Local

Project Humane Polo organizes in response to feral cat ordinance

Wants discussion, to establish TNR program with city

Project Humane Polo members (from left to right) Penny Burkart, Ashley Rinehart and Pam Shore meet with Happy Tails President Mark Razo about plans to approach the Polo City Council regarding its new feral cat ordinance.
Project Humane Polo members (from left to right) Penny Burkart, Ashley Rinehart and Pam Shore meet with Happy Tails President Mark Razo about plans to approach the Polo City Council regarding its new feral cat ordinance.

A group of Polo citizens has organized as Project Humane Polo in response to the City Council’s recent ordinance aimed at controlling the city’s feral cat population.

Multiple Polo residents raised concerns at a Sept. 17 City Council meeting regarding a recent ordinance passed with the intention of controlling the city’s feral cat population.

The ordinance includes fines for people feeding cats outdoors and limits the number of animals that can be “owned” to four.

Residents Ashley Rinehart, Penny Burkart, Pam Shore and Cheryl Galor are working with Happy Tails Humane Society President Mark Razo on the project.

Project Humane Polo has requests of the City Council that include a discussion with “mutual respect,” a commitment to humane solutions with animal issues, and working together to implement a trap-neuter-release program to manage the cat population.

The city has said it’s considered a TNR program at recent meetings, but having to spend money on one has been an issue. Project Humane Polo has said it would work to raise the money for the costs.

Project Humane Polo believes feed ban laws and ordinances are an “ineffective and cruel” approach to feral cats.

Feral cats have long been an issue in the Polo council chambers.

“People are sick and tired of cats being in and defecating in their yard and finding them, some dead,” Alderman Randy Schoon said at the Sept. 17 meeting. “It’s a problem. People feed them and people leave that food out. It attracts cats and more animals. It’s a problem in this town and it needs to stop.”

Project Humane Polo will be working with Razo and Happy Tails going forward and is preparing a presentation to make to the city council, likely at its Sept. 21 meeting.

Those that want to get involved with Project Humane Polo can reach out at PoloilTNR@gmail.com.

Loading more