Subscribe

Subscribe
Subscribe to the Oregon Republican Reporter, Mt Morris Times, Tri-County Press and Forreston Journal

Black Hawk Statue in running for most scenic spot in state

The Black Hawk statue is in the running for one of the top 10 most scenic spots in Illinois. The statue is situated on a high bluff overlooking the Rock River at Lowden State Park near Oregon. File photo
The Black Hawk statue is in the running for one of the top 10 most scenic spots in Illinois. The statue is situated on a high bluff overlooking the Rock River at Lowden State Park near Oregon. File photo

The John Deere Historic Site and the Ronald Reagan Boyhood Home have landed on a list of the state's top 10 historic places, and another area icon is in the running for another honor.

Votes are being taken this week for the most scenic spots, and Oregon's Black Hawk statue is in the running.

Top 200 of Illinois, a joint initiative of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, The (Springfield) State Journal-Register and the Illinois Bicentennial Commission, is looking to name the state's top 10 in 20 categories, as part of this year's birthday celebration.

Illinoisans can vote online every two weeks on the best movies, most inspiring leaders, greatest books, top businesses and other categories for the Top 200 of Illinois as part of the state's bicentennial celebrations.

By the state's 200th birthday on Dec. 3, voters will have chosen 10 favorites in 20 different categories — the Top 200.

The top historic sites have been voted on, and the John Deere site, Grand Detour, was third on the list, and the Reagan home, 810 S. Hennepin Ave. in Dixon, landed in the last spot.

Go to illinoistop200.com to vote, or for more information.

To see previous lists, click on "About Top 200 for Illinois" in the bottom right-hand corner; that will take you to stories on the previous categories.

The list of historic places:

The top 10 Illinois historic sites, as voted on for the Top 200 of Illinois:

• Lincoln's New Salem: About 20 miles northwest of Springfield, the site includes more than 20 reconstructed buildings and one original log cabin from Lincoln's time.

• Pullman: This Chicago neighborhood began as a first-of-its-kind planned community for the workers of the Pullman Palace Car Co. Its historic significance and buildings from the late 1800s earned it the status of National Monument.

• John Deere: This National Historic Landmark in Grand Detour commemorates John Deere's invention of the self-scouring steel plow in 1837, a development that changed agriculture forever.

• Lincoln's Home: Abraham Lincoln owned only one home — a two-story house in Springfield that he bought for $1,500. It is now a National Historic Site.

• Cahokia Mounds: A thousand years ago, it was a thriving city. Today it's a World Heritage Site and the largest pre-Columbian archaeological site north of Mexico.

• Route 66: Route 66 started in Chicago and was the main road from the Midwest to southern California during the Great Depression and the car-crazy years after World War II.

• Old State Capitol: Abraham Lincoln gave his famous "House Divided" speech here and used it as his de facto transition office after being elected president.

• Fort de Chartres: Fort de Chartres was established by the French in 1720along the Mississippi River south of St. Louis. It is a National Historic Landmark and home to the oldest remaining building in Illinois.

• Fort Massac: The French built Fort Massac in 1757 during the French and Indian War. Located in modern Metropolis, it was Illinois' first state park.

• Reagan Home: Ronald Reagan's family moved many times when he was a boy before settling in Dixon. Reagan lived in this house, now on the National Register of Historic Places, for three years.

– Source: Tribune News Service

Loading more